Happy Places
photo competition

National Winners

The judges chose entries that they felt combined both a fantastic picture and an evocative description.

My Corner Of The Allotment By Jane Millum (East Midlands)
The Brick By Michael Orrell (North West)
Playtime By Simon (South West)

The entries were judged by Helen Cadwallader, Photography and New Media Officer, Arts Council England; Wayne Hemmingway, Hemmingway Design; Rob Wilson, Curator, Programmes, RIBA.

Prizes

Each entrant received a HP Photosmart 335 compact photo printer, a signed book and a set of Royal Mail's Modern Architecture First Day Cover, presentation pack and postcards

Regional Winners

The judges chose entries that they felt combined both a fantastic picture and an evocative description.

EAST
1st – Pylon by Martin Grimwood

EAST MIDLANDS
1st – My corner of the allotment by Jane Millum

LONDON
1st – Heathrow departure lounge by Edward Jung
2nd – BedZED village square by Jennie Organ
3rd – Happy–bith–day by Yair

NORTH EAST
1st – Streets of Sunderland by Ashley Mason

NORTH WEST
1st – Alms houses by Joe Logan
2nd – The Brick by Michael Orrell
3rd – Salford Lads Club by Neil Wilkinson

SOUTH EAST
1st – National Theatre gardens by Gail Davey

SOUTH WEST
1st – Chocolate block path, Bristol by Lee Stuart
2nd – Playtime by Simon
3rd – The swing at the end of my garden by Lucy Bell

WEST MIDLANDS
1st – Good times by Ben Turner
2nd – Burcher Green Community Garden by Mattie Underhill

YORKSHIRE
1st – Derwent bike ride (series) by Mike Teare
2nd – Joyful workplace by Heather Paton
3rd – The Old Iron Bridge by Joanne Merritt

SCOTLAND
1st – Anticipation & the vacant gents (series) by Philip Shields
2nd – Flats above Somerfield by Jamie Wilson

The entries were judged by Helen Cadwallader, Photography and New Media Officer, Arts Council England; Wayne Hemmingway, Hemmingway Design; Rob Wilson, Curator, Programmes, RIBA.

Prizes

1st – a signed copy of Alain de Botton's Architecture of Happiness and a signed copy of L.A Climbs: Alternative Uses for Architecture by Alex Hartley or Still Open: The Guide to Traditional London Shops by Sally Venables

2nd – asigned copy of L.A Climbs: Alternative Uses for Architecture by Alex Hartley published by Black Dog Publishing and a set of Royal Mail's Modern Architecture First Day Cover, presentation pack and postcards

3rd – Still Open: The Guide to Traditional London Shops by Sally Venables with Steve Williams, Brian Benson (photographer), published by Black Dog Publishing and a set of Royal Mail's Modern Architecture First Day Cover, presentation pack and postcards

Background

Why Happy Places?

  • The government is building thousands of new houses and the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister is charged with making these individual homes part of 'Sustainable Communities'.
  • But what makes a 'Sustainable Community'?
  • The government says that 'A sustainable community is a place where people want to live and work now and in the future' and that 'Sustainable communities are well designed and built' with 'opportunities for cultural, leisure, community, sport and other activities, including for children and young people'
  • For Architecture Week we've responded to this agenda by setting up this 'Happy Places' photo competition. We're saying that to build successful new places we need to ask people where they like to spend their time now: where they feel relaxed and enjoy themselves. The public are the experts. They can tell us the elements that make a successful social space.

Happiness

  • The study of 'Happiness' is a serious scientific area with worldwide investigation of socio-cultural and political change conducted about every four years by an international network of social scientists. It includes questions about how happy people are and how satisfied they are with their lives.
  • A survey of the top 10% "very happy" people found they spent the least time alone and the most time socialising. Psychologists know that increasing the number of social contacts a miserable person has is the best way of cheering them up. When Jean-Paul Sartre wrote "hell is other people", the arch-pessimist of existentialist angst was wrong.